WINTER IS UPON US! Can you believe she’s already here? It seems like only yesterday we were swimming in the backyard and grilling burgers. Today we want to talk to you about being on the offense to ensure your home provides the best defense against Mother Nature. We all know Chicago Winters can be brutal, and as well seasoned Chicagoans we are well versed and prepared to face the bitterness. From safeguarding our siding, to overhauling a new roof, many of us have already taken the necessary steps to prepping our homes to endure Winter. Doing these projects earlier on in the year can guarantee that now, life will be a lot more comfortable inside our homes, when the weather is treacherous outside. Investments like siding, roofing, and other major renovations are lofty investments that protect us from the elements, but they are also investments that need protection of their own, which is why we are going to feature weekly Tips and Tricks to make sure that these investments are guarded and working for you; this week’s topic- ICE DAMS.

What is an Ice Dam?

Well, An ice dam is an ice build-up on roofs of buildings which may cause water damage to the building and contents if the water leaks through the roof.

An ice dam is a problem of house and building maintenance on sloping roofs in cold climates. Ice dams on roofs form when accumulated snow on a sloping roof melts and flows down the roof, under the insulating blanket of snow, until it reaches below freezing temperature air, typically at the eaves. When the meltwater reaches the freezing air, ice accumulates, forming a dam, and snow that melts later cannot drain properly through the dam. Ice dams may result in leaks through the roofing material, possibly resulting in damaged ceilings, walls, roof structure and insulation, damage or injury when the ice dam falls off or from attempts to remove ice dams.

The melting of roof snow comes from two reasons: Heat from inadequate roof insulation and heat leaks, and inadequate ventilation. This condition is called a warm roof and the heat conducted through the roof melts snow on those areas of the roof that are above heated living spaces, but the snow does not melt on roof overhangs. Also, a small amount of ice damming can occur from the normal freeze-thaw cycle melts snow on warm or sunny days. This snow melt continues to run down the roof on cold nights and freezes when it contacts the cold air.

Scary stuff, we know, but not to fear- we told you have tips and tricks for you, and here they are, (brought to you by, This Old House). They include 3 Fast Fixes and 8 more permanent and preventative measures:

FAST FIXES: 

  1. Blow in Cold Air: Hacking away at ice dams with a hammer, chisel, or shovel is bad for your roofing—and dangerous for you. And throwing salt on them will do more to harm to your plantings than to the ice. Short of praying for warm weather, here are stop-gap measures we recommend. Take a box fan into the attic and aim it at the underside of the roof where water is actively leaking in. This targeted dose of cold air will freeze the water in its tracks. “You’ll stop the leak in a matter of minutes,” says TOH general contractor Tom Silva.
  2. Rake It: Pull off snow with a long-handled aluminum roof rake while you stand safely on the ground. A rake with wheels, like the one shown here, will instantly change the exterior temperature of your roof without damaging shingles.
  3. Deice It: You can also diminish the damage after the dam has formed with…panty hose! Fill the leg of discarded pair of panty hose with a calcium chloride ice melter. Lay the hose onto the roof so it crosses the ice dam and overhangs the gutter. If necessary, use a long-handled garden rake or hoe to push it into position. The calcium chloride will eventually melt through the snow and ice and create a channel for water to flow down into the gutters or off the roof.

PERMANENT FIXES: Getting rid of ice dams for good is simple, in principle: Just keep the entire roof the same temperature as the eaves. You do that by increasing ventilation, adding insulation, and sealing off every possible air leak that might warm the underside of the roof. By taking care of common trouble spots, listed here in order of priority, you should enjoy dam-free winters and use less energy to boot:

1. Ventilate Eaves And Ridge. A ridge vent paired with continuous soffit vents circulates cold air under the entire roof. Both ridge and soffit vents should have the same size openings and provide at least 1 square foot of opening for every 300 square feet of attic floor. Place baffles at the eaves to maintain a clear path for the airflow from the soffit vents.

2. Cap the Hatch. An unsealed attic hatch or whole-house fan is a massive opening for heat to escape. Cover them with weatherstripped caps made from foil-faced foam board held together with aluminum tape.

3. Exhaust to the Outside. Make sure that the ducts connected to the kitchen, bathroom, and dryer vents all lead outdoors through either the roof or walls, but never through the soffit.

4. Add Insulation. More insulation on the attic floor keeps the heat where it belongs. To find how much insulation your attic needs, check with your local building department.

 

5. Install Sealed Can Lights. Old-style recessed lights give off great plumes of heat and can’t be insulated without creating a fire hazard. Replace them with sealed “IC” fixtures, which can be covered with insulation.

6. Flash Around Chimneys. Bridge the gap between chimney and house framing with L-shaped steel flashing held in place with unbroken beads of a fire-stop sealant. Using canned spray foam or insulation isn’t fire safe.

 

7. Seal and Insulate Ducts. Spread fiber-reinforced mastic on the joints of HVAC ducts and exhaust ducts. Cover them entirely with R-5 or R-6 foil-faced fiberglass.

8. Caulk Penetrations. Seal around electrical cables and vent pipes with a fire-stop sealant. Also, look for any spots where light shines up from below or the insulation is stained black by the dirt from passing air.

We hope you found these Tips and Tricks useful! Keep checking back for more ideas on how to protect your roofing and siding investments. For more information on new roofs, and siding give us a call! 708-439-1237 or email us a prolinehomecontractors@gmail.com.

(708) 479-1237 12624 W. 159th St. Homer Glen, IL 60491